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Dispute resolution guide is being built with the participation of Honduras key stakeholders

  • Actions are carried out at the Barras de Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge in the Honduran Atlantic

June, 28th 2017. With the expectation of meeting key stakeholders within the framework of the co-management of Barras de Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge (RVSBCS in its Spanish acronym), as well as triangular information on lessons learned and defining the conceptual framework of the guide of dispute resolution for this refuge located on the Atlantic coast of Honduras, from June 26th to June 30th staff of the Forest, Biodiversity and Climate Change Program (known in Spanish as PBByCC) of CATIE (The Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center) work in the area, on the framework of the Strengthening the Subsystem of Marine Protected Areas Project.

Ángela Díaz, a CATIE researcher who works as a governance specialist in the project, expressed that the work being done is of great importance to work on the construction of a guide that will facilitate dispute resolution processes in protected areas with co-management agreements, so it is of great value the accompaniment of the local partners of the Secretariat of Energy, Natural Resources, Environment and Mines of Honduras (Mi Ambiente+ in its Spanish acronym).

In Honduras, the co-management of protected areas is carried out with three partners, such as the national government, through the State Forestry Administration-Honduran Forest Development Corporation (AFE-COHDEFOR in its Spanish acronym) and the Forest Conservation Institute (known in Spanish as ICF), together with the local government, through the Environmental Municipal Units (UMA in its Spanish acronym) and civil society, represented by non-governmental organizations.

Díaz explained that in the case of RVSBCS, stakeholders and professionals from the municipalities of Esparta, La Masica, San Francisco and El Porvenir, all from the Atlántida department in Honduras, as well as representatives from the Cuero y Salado Foundation, field technicians working in communities, community leaders, as well as representatives of local and national institutions.

Led by the Latin American Chair of Protected Areas and Biological Corridors Kenton Miller in CATIE, the project focuses on operating systems to increase the coverage, operational effectiveness and financial sustainability of marine and coastal protected areas on the northern coast of Honduras, which is coordinated with strategic partners of importance to the country such as Mi Ambiente+ and the Smithsonian Institute.

More information:

Ángela Díaz
Researcher
Forest, Biodiversity and Climate Change Program
CATIE
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Marianela Argüello L.
Forest, Biodiversity and Climate Change Program
CATIE
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